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Here’s The Scoop … Does Santa Have A Parking Requirement At The North Pole? ….

December 9, 2010 by Barbara

HOW MANY REINDEER PER 1000 SQ. FEET? ….

Dear Readers … Vice Mayor Dodd went back and looked at what transpired during the direction given concerning item 14 a. Parking Requirement Modifications and his motion for a 3 year “compromise” for a parking suspension program …He wants to make sure the support is there for a full elimination as he contends is the way to go and does not want a repeat of what occurred earlier in the evening’s meeting when at the 11th hour this Commission did what they swore they would not …act like the previous Commission and throw out an ordinance up for 2nd reading…and cost the Town in staff/board (P+Z)/ Commission time as well as the cost incurred for the process…That item was Ord.2010-18 Amending Sec. 30-313(31) “Accessory Buildings And Structures”…It went down in a 2-3 vote with Vincent/Clottey/Minnet voting no… VM Dodd asked for an amendment to fine anyone who leaves the non-permitted  structure up during a hurricane warning to avoid damage it might cause.. I agreed with Comm. Vincent that it should not be added and thought he did a good job of comparing it to patio furniture etc… Where he went wrong was his height reconsideration …no wanting it equal to a one story house …As one reader stated smaller is a dog house not a storage shed…. This height was passed after discussion by the P & Z a few months back and in the 1st reading ordinance… It was surprising the TAtty. went along with VM Dodd’s request as she is on record when the same question of any recourse for destruction resulting to a neighbor from such a structure was asked by Mayor Minnet who used Comm. Clottey’s previous tale of her own property damage after a storm from a neighbors debris.. The TAtty. was pretty clear that the Town would not want to get in the middle of a dispute and she should have stuck to that advise when faced with this amendment …in this writer’s opinion.. After all the Mayor was correct on when Code would be going out to check …Comm. Sasser also made it clear he thought this was not his cup of tea… In the end in again what appeared to be deja vu to the previous Comm./Administration this P + Z passed ordinance went down… What should have happened is the amendment should have been voted down and the ordinance as prepared should have then been voted on.. That option should have been offered up to the Comm. by the TAtty/ TM and/or the Mayor…But Mayor Minnet is on record she did not want the ordinance in the first place and does not want sheds in residential yards…Mayor Minnet is the only member of the dais who does not live in a house with a yard …If she was she too would know sheds of this type are needed …So much for the “we need to follow the advice of our boards” defense!… What happens now for those with these sheds in their yards?… Will they be sought out as those with sheds and boats were by the Colon led Code Enforcement a few years back?… GULP!…

Vice Mayor Dodd’s Request for the Round Table …

SUBJECT TITLE: Parking Ordinance Draft
EXPLANATION: I would like a “show of Hands” whether the vote on Dec 7th truly reflects the majority wish for a
“Temporary suspension program for three years with a review ” or whether a “Parking elimination until such time program”
is what the commission really wants. I do not want to waste staff time on providing an ordinance for first reading only to
find it gets substantially changed before second reading. I do not want a repeat of the “Shed” ordinance since we as a
commission need to reach agreement by the time staff draft an Ordinance for first reading .
RECOMMENDATION: After very careful consideration I personally see no overriding legal reason why the
commission shouldn’t adopt a “Parking elimination until staff brings back a report that here is a problem” as it
conveys a totally different connotation of where we as a commission stand and our policy towards new restaurant
businesses that want to invest in our town.

BC- Let’s see those hands Commissioners…then let the PR begin…No Parking Requirements for Restaurants (types) in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea!…

On this same topic a Google produced the following from November 2001 …

“The Future of Parking in
Broward County
A guide for the development of a County Parking Policy
A report to the Transportation Planning and Air Quality
Divisions of the Broward County Department of Planning and
Environmental Protection
November 2001
The Center for Creating the Future, Inc.”

BC- If you don’t read it all…below are a few excerpts that  are my favorites…/ We can succeed with full parking exemption for restaurants to allow for businesses to come in and set up shop …which will ultimately lead to the topic of incentives offered to them from the Town and discussed ad nauseum by the past 3 Master Plan Steering Committee’s (comprised of both factions )…in order to spruce up these these businesses and buildings …. inside and out!…A jumpstart!….

“The Center emphasizes that parking solutions require less capital and shorter lead times than
other traffic-related actions and can be adopted as needed.”

“We live today with the restrictions and rules
decided at least 10 years ago. Each local government has standards that impose requirements
for parking, ranging from upper-end suburban cities where every car is required to be in a
garage, to Fort Lauderdale, where there is no requirement for parking in the downtown. If asked,
most residents of Fort Lauderdale would probably be surprised that their city does not require
parking for new buildings downtown, but this is not as dramatic as it sounds. A developer
wouldn’t be able to get financing or tenants if there were no parking. The market, not the city,
sets the amount of parking needed. The recommendations in this report can be put in place at the
discretion of policymakers to diminish the negative impacts of additional parking that will be
added in the coming years.”

“Since this is a parking study, we assume that, as the County’s population increases, the demand
for parking will increase. This is not strictly linear, i.e. one person does not equal one car equals
X residential and job-related parking spaces. It requires, at the very least, age and income
analysis as well as marketing trends analysis. For example — just two of the many possible
examples — will the trend of more people eating more meals outside the home continue or
decline as we age? The Center forecasts dramatic 10-to-20-year increases in the longevity of the
US population over the next 30 to 50 years, so will we drive more (more free time) or less
(reduced skills)? Probably both: with more people over the age of 75, virtually all will want to
remain mobile. Some of us will require more shuttles and others will continue to drive (using
anti-aging nutrients to retain our faculties).
There are several trends that could lead to reduced demand for parking spaces: more reliance on
public transportation, more telecommuting, and more internet and telephone shopping. As the
analysis and the recommendations will demonstrate, PARKING SOLUTIONS ARE MUCH
LESS CAPITAL INTENSE AND HAVE MUCH SHORTER IMPLEMENTATION TIMES
THAN RELATED TRAFFIC-ISSUE SOLUTIONS. Necessary changes can be made
incrementally with much less risk of time and capital. (THIS IS A KEY POINT OF THIS
STUDY. Key points will be highlighted and numbered. This is Key Point 1.)”

“We have followed many paths in our research, our analysis, and our presentation. The Center
considers it essential that such studies be accessible to the informed general public as well as
technicians and experienced policy makers. A thick stack of paper simply will not be read. Our
report is meant to be seen and the mounds of data available will be accessible but not included.
The information presented will be what is necessary to begin developing a plan for the future.
That plan can begin to be implemented at once, in six months, or two years. As the specific
recommendations will make clear, some should begin sooner rather than later, that is, to
CREATE THE FUTURE OF PARKING NOW RATHER THAN WAITING FOR IT. (Key
Point 2.)”

“Market clearing
Finally, there is the effect of people’s daily choices: If it gets too bad, they just won’t do it. If the
experience of parking is too stressful, expensive or difficult, people won’t park there and they
will go somewhere else. (Key Point 5.) It is easy to misunderstand this phenomenon, known to
economists as market clearing. It is part process, part explanation, part solution. Some simple
examples: we will not reach actual gridlock; people will go elsewhere. We will not run out of
oil: we will switch to substitutes or change our behavior.
We often hear people say that some location in Broward County has reached its traffic or parking
limit. Perhaps. For example, traffic in Miami is worse, yet tolerated. There are parking
facilities in Miami which have eight or more levels of parking, all full. There is obviously some
attraction in Miami, either jobs, business opportunities, entertainment, or whatever, that
continues to pull different people, at different times, into Miami in spite of the congestion. Also,
it is clear, at least anecdotally, that there are people who don’t go to Miami because of the
congestion who would go, or perhaps so at off peak times, if there was less congestion. Each location, of course, will have a different degree of “magnetism.”

“The Center recommends creation of a Parking Information Network which would provide local
officials, developers and individuals with more information and more accessible information
about parking options.
A comment about the role of public policy in the evolution of parking: “Public policy today
determines the environment of 2010 and beyond.” We live today with the restrictions and rules
decided at least 10 years ago. Each local government has standards that impose requirements
for parking, ranging from upper-end suburban cities where every car is required to be in a
garage, to Fort Lauderdale, where there is no requirement for parking in the downtown. If asked,
most residents of Fort Lauderdale would probably be surprised that their city does not require
parking for new buildings downtown, but this is not as dramatic as it sounds. A developer
wouldn’t be able to get financing or tenants if there were no parking. The market, not the city,
sets the amount of parking needed. The recommendations in this report can be put in place at the
discretion of policymakers to diminish the negative impacts of additional parking that will be
added in the coming years.”

…………………

Extensive Excerpts ………

“Executive Summary
Introduction
Broward County’s Division of Transportation Planning asked the Center for Creating the Future,
Inc., to look at the future of parking issues in Broward County, including a study of current
parking conditions in Broward County, the impact of these conditions on drivers and the
environment, options for responses to anticipated parking conditions, and recommendations.
The Center has presented this report in an innovative fashion, maintaining its work on an ongoing
basis on its web site, www.creatingthefuture.org, and publishing it on a compact disk as
well as in print format. The print format has been designed to approximate a web site in its
appearance, with many pictures.
Parking presents more issues than just “Do we have enough places to park?” In addition to the
objective reality of sufficient spaces, perceptions of sufficiency, ease of access and
environmental impact must also be considered. Further, while we have focused on parking,
parking issues are inextricably linked with traffic issues and, to that extent, we have addressed
that link. Simply put, if parking is plentiful, more people will drive; if parking is difficult, fewer
people will drive (or they will go elsewhere). Put another way, the better the parking, the more
likely traffic will increase: if you build more parking facilities, just as if you build more roads,
they will come. Restricting parking, coupled with providing options to driving (e.g., remote
parking and shuttles or more and better public transportation) will reduce demand for parking.

Presently, there is not an objective shortage of parking in Broward County except for certain
peak times at popular commercial locations and in the area surrounding the Broward County
Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale.
There is, however, a perception of a parking shortage, resulting from the rapid development of
certain areas, and a lack of adequate information about parking locations. Also, drivers,
accustomed to surface parking, are reluctant to use parking ramps, especially the higher floors of
those ramps. Stress on many drivers results from these conditions.
This report also emphasizes the environmental damage resulting from too many cars driving
around, looking for the perfect parking space. Methods for reducing this environmental damage
are presented. The study concludes that demand for parking is most likely to increase as the
population increases. It presents a wide variety of options in response to those increased
demands ranging from providing better information about parking options, to diversion of
drivers to public transportation or remove parking and shuttles into impacted areas.
Providing more parking downtown will increase traffic and congestion, but that gives all the
more reason for public policy makers to maximize the use of existing spaces rather than just
allowing more spaces to be built.
The Center recommends creation of a Parking Information Network which would provide local
officials, developers and individuals with more information and more accessible information
about parking options.
A comment about the role of public policy in the evolution of parking: “Public policy today
determines the environment of 2010 and beyond.” We live today with the restrictions and rules
decided at least 10 years ago. Each local government has standards that impose requirements
for parking, ranging from upper-end suburban cities where every car is required to be in a
garage, to Fort Lauderdale, where there is no requirement for parking in the downtown. If asked,
most residents of Fort Lauderdale would probably be surprised that their city does not require
parking for new buildings downtown, but this is not as dramatic as it sounds. A developer
wouldn’t be able to get financing or tenants if there were no parking. The market, not the city,
sets the amount of parking needed. The recommendations in this report can be put in place at the
discretion of policymakers to diminish the negative impacts of additional parking that will be
added in the coming years.

Conclusion
The Center emphasizes that parking solutions require less capital and shorter lead times than
other traffic-related actions and can be adopted as needed. However, since we can anticipate
these future needs, we have the opportunity to act before they become critical and can become
even better able to anticipate the future by developing better information.

1. Overview of present issues
Conventionally, a parking study involves taking a discrete area, analyzing the zoning uses and
densities and multiplying by a formula or formulas to arrive at an estimated need for parking.
An example is the Beach Study completed in 2000 for the City of Fort Lauderdale by Walker
Parking Consultants, which used a growth rate of 2.88% to predict an estimated shortfall of 758
parking spaces during the busiest season by 2005 (growing to a deficit of 2,209 spaces by
2020).
This study will go well beyond that. This study will address parking issues throughout Broward
County and, while urban areas with intense commercial uses will receive the most attention,
suburban commercial areas and certain residential parking issues will be addressed.

While the basic issue is, is there enough parking and, if not, what can be done about it, we will
also address the negative environmental impacts of parking: emissions resulting from searching
for parking spaces inside and outside ramps and the loss of carbon dioxide-oxygen exchange as
more grass is paved over.
Since this is a parking study, we assume that, as the County’s population increases, the demand
for parking will increase. This is not strictly linear, i.e. one person does not equal one car equals
X residential and job-related parking spaces. It requires, at the very least, age and income
analysis as well as marketing trends analysis. For example — just two of the many possible
examples — will the trend of more people eating more meals outside the home continue or
decline as we age? The Center forecasts dramatic 10-to-20-year increases in the longevity of the
US population over the next 30 to 50 years, so will we drive more (more free time) or less
(reduced skills)? Probably both: with more people over the age of 75, virtually all will want to
remain mobile. Some of us will require more shuttles and others will continue to drive (using
anti-aging nutrients to retain our faculties).
There are several trends that could lead to reduced demand for parking spaces: more reliance on
public transportation, more telecommuting, and more internet and telephone shopping. As the
analysis and the recommendations will demonstrate, PARKING SOLUTIONS ARE MUCH
LESS CAPITAL INTENSE AND HAVE MUCH SHORTER IMPLEMENTATION TIMES
THAN RELATED TRAFFIC-ISSUE SOLUTIONS. Necessary changes can be made
incrementally with much less risk of time and capital. (THIS IS A KEY POINT OF THIS
STUDY. Key points will be highlighted and numbered. This is Key Point 1.)

Finally, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 have raised another issue which was not
foreseen in the original scope of this study. Security should, however, be addressed as the extent
of the risk becomes clarified. A look back at the history of similar events shows that present
responses are almost certainly overly cautious, but nonetheless, the issue should be addressed at
a later time.
We have, to the extent possible, made an effort to limit this study to parking issues and not slide
into traffic issues. In fact, the separation is not a clear or simple one. At a very basic supplydemand
level, more and cheaper parking will attract more cars, creating more traffic.
Conversely, limited, expensive parking will discourage drivers and limit traffic.
Many analyses of traffic problems look to parking restrictions as a traffic control mechanism.
(See Alan Durning’s article.) In downtown San Francisco, creation of new parking spaces is
strictly limited in an effort to deflect people to public transportation.
Further, poor parking information can cause drivers to spend time and road space looking for
parking spaces, thus increasing traffic volume. Occasionally, cars back up entering crowded
parking facilities, either at ramps or surface lots, can actually block road traffic.

This report will not expand into traffic issues, but the reader should keep in mind that improving
parking conditions will improve traffic conditions.
2. Methods
We have followed many paths in our research, our analysis, and our presentation. The Center
considers it essential that such studies be accessible to the informed general public as well as
technicians and experienced policy makers. A thick stack of paper simply will not be read. Our
report is meant to be seen and the mounds of data available will be accessible but not included.
The information presented will be what is necessary to begin developing a plan for the future.
That plan can begin to be implemented at once, in six months, or two years. As the specific
recommendations will make clear, some should begin sooner rather than later, that is, to
CREATE THE FUTURE OF PARKING NOW RATHER THAN WAITING FOR IT. (Key
Point 2.)
Each reader should be able to reach his or her own conclusions from the presentation as to the
timing of the recommendations.

Present Parking Conditions in Broward County
We will address four elements regarding present parking conditions in Broward County:
a) Availability: Is there enough parking?
b) Access: How easy is it to park?
c) Perceptions: Why is parking stressful?
d) Environmental impacts of parking
a) Is there enough parking in Broward County?
There are some calculations about adequacy of parking in Broward County, but certainly nothing
approaching completeness. Since it would be a number which changed daily, as new spaces are
developed and old spaces put to other uses, without constant updating, even a 99% accurate
number (unlikely) would quickly become out of date.
(A rough estimate of parking available in 17 garages for Downtown Fort Lauderdale is 10,688
spaces. Details of this estimate are given on the Future of Parking web site at
www.geocities.com/futureofparking/pin.html.) In addition, the inventory would need to be
matched with demand requirements, an even more elusive target (see page 19 for a case study of
two office buildings, where the ratio of employees to parking spaces approaches 1.25-to-1, one
of the highest ratios in Broward County). To some degree, demand and utilization are a function
of availability. The easier it is to park, the less likely we are to consider alternatives such as
walking, public transportation or staying put.

Extensive observations and interviews, while necessarily anecdotal, have provided evidence
which indicates there is no actual shortage of parking spaces in Broward County. (The
perception of shortages will be addressed below.) This can be checked by observation and
experience. For example, viewing the area thought to be in the most critical condition,
downtown Fort Lauderdale, from the top floor of any tall building will reveal, at any given time,
significant numbers of empty spaces. Similarly, on a tour of downtown, one will only
occasionally encounter a “Lot Full” sign.
There are exceptions. In bad weather, indoor parking can reach capacity as more people wish to
park indoors and those already in, choose to stay in. The area around the Broward County
Courthouse also experiences overloads in the morning hours as lawyers, litigants and jurors all
attempt to find nearby spaces at the same time. Recent security measures have exacerbated this
situation. Prior to that, the switch to selecting jurors from the list of licensed drivers rather than
from the list of registered voters increased the size of the jury pools necessary to fill juries. More
pre-screening (already suggested to County parking officials by The Center) may improve this
situation.
People’s expectations that a parking space should be in the very closest proximity to their
destination, adds to the Courthouse problem and the concomitant morning congestion.
There is considerable expansion of parking facilities on the north side of the New River, at the
Bank of America building, the first Union Building and One River Plaza. Another peak load
circumstance in the downtown is the Florida Atlantic University/Broward Community College
Higher Education Complex at Las Olas and Southeast Third Avenue. That problem is
compounded by student and faculty expectations that parking should not only be contiguous to
the buildings but free as well. Utilization of the top floor of the City Park garage by FAU and
BCC has improved this situation considerably.

Peak-Hour Shortages
Elsewhere in Broward County, parking shortages are almost entirely peak-hour problems,
usually resulting from demand that exceeds the conventional parking formulas. One or more
exceptionally popular restaurants or bars can throw off the conventional calculations for a
shopping center by a wide margin. Market clearing and the usual ebb and flow of consumer
choices will usually handle these situations: that is, either because of the parking difficulties or
just the fickleness of popular taste, the “crisis” will pass. Some cities, such as Weston, have
responded by changing their formulas. (A complete set of parking ordinances for Broward
County and its municipalities can be accessed by sending an e-mail message to Rosalia Bunge
(rbunge@co.broward.fl.us) at Broward County’s Department of Planning and Environmental
Protection.)
Private-sector strategies can include providing valet parking at peak times, which increases both
customer satisfaction and parking capacity and raising prices. (A fuller discussion of pricing
strategies will be found below). Fort Lauderdale Beach, for example has less intense parking

problems than a few years ago, when it seemed that “everyone” had to go to Beach Place.
Other commercial situations, such as warehouses and office parks, seem to be satisfactorily
served by present formulas. The City of Weston has added an innovative approach to these uses
by tailoring the parking requirements of new office park developments to the actual intended
use. For example, a trans-shipping facility with a small number of employees and no visiting
customers will be required to make fewer spaces than an electronics assembly facility or
telemarketing operation.
Opportunities to park in residential developments also seem to be adequate at this time, with a
few serious exceptions. When the resident mix of a multi- unit complex changes, severe
problems can result. Most of the condominiums built in the 1970s in Broward County were
designed for retirees who rarely had more than one vehicle. Those unit owners are now being
replaced by much younger couples, in most of which both partners work. Further, as housing
costs rise, apartments which were previously rented to one person and one car are now being
occupied by two working roommates. Given the economic status of these projects, most
physical solutions are not financially feasible, for example, tearing down some buildings to
create parking space or acquiring adjacent properties for more parking. The cost squeeze in
these situations can be severe and while it is not a public obligation, local governments need to
be aware and prepared to assist with zoning changes and in other ways.
There are a few other special peak-hour situations such as churches and various special events
where alternatives to supplying more parking, discussed below, should be considered.
To sum up, there is no overall parking shortage, much less a parking crisis, in Broward County in
terms of availability of parking spaces. That, however, is not the whole story. Access to parking
is an important component of any parking analysis. How can we make parking easier for
people?

b) Access: How easy it is to park?
Improving access to parking, making it easier to park, increases the perception of availability of
parking and reduces the stress of parking. (Key Point 3.)
Presently, people feel there are fewer parking spaces than there actua lly are because they are not
aware of them or feel they are difficult to find or park in.
The problem surfaces in different ways for different people. Tourists may be completely
unaware of parking locations, occasional visitors unaware of all the possibilities and frequent
parkers unaware of alternatives to their accustomed parking spot. Once at the parking garage or
area, signage or lighting may be inadequate, making the parking experience an unpleasant one.
Special events, which change traffic patterns, such as a Las Olas Art Fair or the Air and Sea
Show, compound access to parking dramatically , but they also give us examples of how to deal

with even everyday parking problems.
First, information for the public, from both governmental and private sources, should be plentiful
and understandable. As a driver approaches his or her destination, information should be
continuously available. Even within a parking structure, signage is important, both its visual
clarity and its understandability. As people know more and their experiences get better, the time
necessary to park will decrease, as will stress. Those responsible should thoroughly test their
signs for these factors.
Signs are proliferating throughout our environment. As we increase information about parking
access, it must be done in an esthetically pleasing fashion. It should also be predictable, that is,
in the same locations as testing shows most enhances readability. Absorbing the information
should distract drivers as little as possible, while being effective.
In Europe, much effort goes into making parking “invisible”, concealing parking facilities to the
greatest degree possible. Where it is essential to preserve the historical and esthetic appeal of an
area, this is appropriate. Too often, however, these suggestions come from people who are
merely hostile to automobiles. Most Americans do not share these feelings.

The Aesthetics of Parking
Parking facilities should be as attractive as any other part of our visual environment but they
needn’t be invisible. U.S. drivers like to see where their car is and is going to be. (Key Point 4.)
That factor should not be ignored by planners and urban designers.
c) Perceptions: Why is parking stressful?
The 1990 Census put Fort Lauderdale’s population at 149,377 and in 2000 the city stood at
152,397. The County’s population is over ten times that, 1,623,018 (2000). In 1970, it was only
620,100, just before the take-off. Further, while Fort Lauderdale has long been the County seat,
its downtown and beach did not begin to take off until the mid-1990s. Similarly, suburban
communities have only recently jumped not only in residential population (Weston, Sunrise,
Plantation, Coral Springs), but in commercial development. As a result, all but the most recent
arrivals remember when they could park “anywhere” with no hassle and virtually no charge.
They have forgotten that there was little or nothing to do when they got there. The infrastructure
of downtown Fort Lauderdale, the government office buildings such as the Federal Courthouse,
the State of Florida Office Building, were built in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s but the private
sector response did not kick in until the early ‘90s, fueled to a significant degree by the multiple
offshoots of the entrepreneurial energy of Wayne Huizenga and his associates. All of a sudden,
after 20 years of effort downtown was an “overnight success.” Street parking or the first floor or
two of a parking garage was not enough to park everyone, so a garage building boom in Fort
Lauderdale has given the city more than ten garages with more than 4 levels.

What are acceptable parking conditions?
A parking space on the fourth floor of a parking garage underneath or adjacent to one’s office
building for a monthly fee of $70 (a bargain in New York and an ecstatic circumstance even in
Miami) is considered an insuperable burden in Broward County. On Fort Lauderdale beach,
after the (forced) departure of Spring Break in 1985 and 1986, there was an idyllic period
beginning in the early 1990s when redevelopment was as yet undiscovered. One had the feeling
of having the beach to oneself. When the rest of South Florida and the world discovered our
paradise, things changed. The “crisis” came with the opening of Beach Place, a multi-story
complex of shops and restaurants attached to a time-share hotel. “Everyone” not only had to go
there, they had to park there, not a block away. Now that the initial excitement has calmed down
and people have gotten more savvy, traffic and parking have subsided to the level of “merely
very crowded” during the peak of the tourist season.
Similarly, as suburban communities like Weston and Coral Springs grew, commercial
development moving to the rhythms of natural economic patterns did not always keep up. That,
plus the occasional hyperpopularity of a particular bar, restaurant or shop, would lead to a
parking “crisis.” Eventually, the market place and individuals responded to these conditions:
more parking is created, more restaurants are opened in other areas, and people change their
behavior, either consciously or unconsciously. If a parking or traffic “crisis” continues at a
particular location, it means people want to go there and will pay the price in time and stress.
Local governments can only do so much about these perceptions, but there are several relatively
easy steps which can be taken in the near term to ameliorate these problems. They will be set
forth in our recommendations. It is difficult to quantify the stress levels caused by parking
problems, but they do have social and individual health consequences and should not be brushed
off.

d) Environmental impacts of parking
Most people do not consider parking as an environmental issue, but in fact it is.
In congested downtown areas, it is easiest to see: cars driving around looking for a place to park
add to the amount of air pollution. Within parking structures, where exhausts are trapped, is a
further intensification of the problem. Exhaust fans or open structures reduce the levels inside
the structures by spreading pollutants to the outside, but this only adds to ambient pollution
levels. Air quality regulators are aware of this and limit the amount of exhaust pollution allowed
within designated areas and increased development can be halted if levels are exceeded (see the
web page about the Parking Facility License).
Air Quality
Broward County is presently regarded as having adequate air quality (after having been under
EPA restrictions that required vehicle emissions to be checked annually). Our air quality is

constantly being monitored and we must be continuously aware of the impact of automobile
generated pollution on our air quality and quality of life.
The issue is not limited to densely deve loped urban areas. Large suburban parking lots can also
be large generators of auto exhaust as people search for parking spaces. Furthermore, the
instinctive response to a shortage of parking, even if only at a few peak periods, is to require
paving over more land for more parking. This not only fails to reduce pollution, it reduces air
quality by eliminating vegetation which cleans our air and exchanges carbon dioxide for
oxygen. Also, while we now require storm water runoff to be contained on site at parking lots, if
the water does not filter back into the aquifer, it will either require expensive treatment or dump
pollutants into our waterways.

The Future of Parking in Broward County
(Most Likely Outcomes)
The easiest projection to make of any future trend is a straight line following existing data. In
the case of parking needs in Broward County, or almost anywhere, the easiest forecast would be
to take present spaces — exact number unknown — and multiply by the anticipated increase in the
population. It then becomes a simple matter to predict that Broward County will need to provide
“more” parking spaces, both public and private, tied to population forecasts. A more
conservative forecast would be “much more” parking, the outer limit would be “a whole lot
more.” This is not just an attempt at humor, it is a reductio ad absurdum of present parking
planning: build more of the same as demand requires.
Refining our forecasts
This model falls well short of what is possible. First, population numbers can be refined.
Driving, working, education, shopping, entertaining are some of the constituent elements of
parking demand that can be made much more precise by demographic analysis: age and income,
information which is easily accessible, can reduce or increase the forecast of anticipated drivers
and their likely destinations. Young children need to be driven to school, older children will in
many cases drive themselves. Age and income figures, properly analyzed, can give us
reasonably reliable figures on shopping, dining out, employment and so forth. Private sector
marketing analyses do this all the time. Knowing the answer to these questions can help us to
refine our forecasts, reducing the chance of over- or under-reaction. Fortunately, parking
changes require a relatively short-term turnaround, and corrections can be relatively easily made.
In addition to refining our forecasts, there are plausible alternatives that could lead to a need for
less parking than a simple or even complex demographic forecast would indicate.
Transportation planners for many years have been urging more reliance on public transportation
and this message is beginning to influence decision makers. Investment in Tri- Rail has been
increased. Expansion of Miami-Dade’s MetroRail into Broward County, the Community Bus

program in various municipalities, the Waterbus waterways transportation program and
expansion of conventional bus service, with more routes, longer hours of service and shorter
intervals between buses are all underway. Historically, these changes have lagged population
increases, but that is beginning to change, with public transportation ridership showing greater
increases, in some circumstances, than the population. While this is not the place to discus s the
cost-effectiveness of such programs, there is no doubt that greater availability, improved access,
better information, and momentum* will increase ridership and reduce demand for parking.
Impact of technology
Other trends, difficult to quantify, will also have some impact. More people are doing some or
all of their work at home. As the technologies which facilitate working at or near home become
better and more familiar, such as wireless Internet access, voice recognition for email and
teleconferencing, we can expect these trends to reduce traffic and parking demand.
Similarly, while the bursting of the dot-com bubble has put a hold on shop-at-home trends, there
is no doubt that these programs will resume and to a greatly expanded audience as convenience,
product quality and service improve. Publix, for example, is undertaking an Internet grocery
shopping service. While the timing of widespread acceptance of this service is uncertain, it is
not difficult to imagine a virtual shopping experience: going down aisles, looking at shelves,
making selections and then having them delivered to a specially designed food-port at one’s
home or apartment. We can see this future; it’s the timing that’s unclear. When it happens,
parking demand will be reduced. A further extension of this notion: as the quality of prepared
foods continues to increase as it has been, another reason to leave home or park at a store or
restaurant on the way home will be eliminated. This will not happen all of a sudden, but it is
happening now. Its impact is hard to measure, but this part of the future is beginning to happen
now.
Market clearing
Finally, there is the effect of people’s daily choices: If it gets too bad, they just won’t do it. If the
experience of parking is too stressful, expensive or difficult, people won’t park there and they
will go somewhere else. (Key Point 5.) It is easy to misunderstand this phenomenon, known to
economists as market clearing. It is part process, part explanation, part solution. Some simple
examples: we will not reach actual gridlock; people will go elsewhere. We will not run out of
oil: we will switch to substitutes or change our behavior.
We often hear people say that some location in Broward County has reached its traffic or parking
limit. Perhaps. For example, traffic in Miami is worse, yet tolerated. There are parking
facilities in Miami which have eight or more levels of parking, all full. There is obviously some
attraction in Miami, either jobs, business opportunities, entertainment, or whatever, that
continues to pull different people, at different times, into Miami in spite of the congestion. Also,
it is clear, at least anecdotally, that there are people who don’t go to Miami because of the
congestion who would go, or perhaps so at off peak times, if there was less congestion. Each

location, of course, will have a different degree of “magnetism.”
In any case, market-clearing will to some degree suppress demand if conditions are “below
acceptable” to certain individuals.
Alternatives (Possible Outcomes)
The relationship between Parking and Congestion is close: If drivers know that there is a
parking space waiting for them, they will try to drive to work. Congestion takes place because
drivers are arriving at or near the traditional beginning of the office work day (9 a.m.).
Flextime, an arrangement where arrival times are staggered, is used in other metropolitan areas
to reduce the peak congestion. A survey was conducted as part of this study to determine the
level of support for flexible arrival times. Past surveys have indicated that managers are less
enthusiastic than their employees are about later start times.
The survey included a question that specifically mentioned e-mail, which has become more
widespread. This survey is believed to be the first to ask about answering e-mail from a home
computer. The survey was sent to the Stiles Buildings 350 and 450 East Las Olas and 800
copies were distributed, thanks to assistance and coordination by Judy Carter, the building
manager.

The Question
Are you able to do some of your work at home, perhaps answering email before you commute to
work after the rush hour? The responses are probably more from people who are advocates of
flex-time work schedules. We expect that the results will fall to about 20 in 100 in support of
flex time.
The critical impediments mentioned in the report are
“My boss wants me in the office at 9 a.m.”
“The e-mail system does not allow me to view the email from home.”
Possible actions
An education campaign could be started, drawing on the experience of companies in Southern
California, where thousands of workers arrive earlier or later and avoid the rush hour.
Creating an email account on a web-based email system, such as Yahoo.com or hotmail.com,
allows the workers to check e-mail from home. Perhaps a worker who arrives early to work can
check the email for other workers and forward e- mail messages to the “later-arriving” workers to
work on before they come to the office.
Parking Information Sources Which Are Available Now
The following contact numbers will allow most organizers of events to quickly identify 90% of

the convenient garage space available for use by event attendees on weekends and evenings:
County Parking Garages (located west of Andrews Avenue and South of Broward Blvd.)
a) the Garage shared with Riverfront Mall
b) the Garage connected by a skywalk to the Government Center
The County Courthouse parking garage (1800 spaces)
Ed Davis, 954.357.6030, fax 954.357.5544
edavis@broward.org
115 South Andrews Avenue, Suite 504
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
Ed Davis is the County’s Parking Manager — A position created when the country began to lease
its spaces through a professional parking management company.
Judy Carter, Stiles Building Property Manager, 954.525.9316, at judyc@stiles.com, covering the
properties at 350 East Las Olas Blvd. (725 parking spaces) and 450 East Las Olas Blvd. (577
parking spaces), totaling 1302 spaces
City of Fort Lauderdale, John Hoelzle, 954.828.3700, with 2,127 parking spaces in the City Park
Parking Garage (and 31 handicapped spaces). Spaces are available in the parking garage next to
the main library. In the month of August 2001, the city sold 2,531 permits for the 2,127 spaces
(obviously, not everyone with a permit uses the space every day).
Creating the Future of Parking in Broward County (Recommendations)
We do not have to sit and wait for the future to arrive. The basic principle of The Center for
Creating the Future, Inc., is tha t we can create our future by understanding what it holds in store
for us and by acting now to prepare for it.
Broward County can begin to create the future of parking in a variety of ways which we will
present as a menu of policy choices. Most of these choices can be immediately implemented,
others have a longer time frame for implementation, whether because the problem is not yet
severe enough or the technology, while foreseeable, is not yet available as a practical matter.
The first choice, which we strongly reject, is to do nothing.
Doing nothing is a choice just as much as adopting one or more policy choices (Key Point 6).
Doing nothing actually means choosing to have a wide variety of public and private decision
makers respond on an ad hoc basis to each need or “crisis” as it arises. If the response is
inadequate, people will adjust various ways and life will go on (see discussion above about
market clearing).
The difficulty with this choice is that it is unnecessarily inefficient. We say unnecessarily
because, as will be shown, parking can be improved without massive capital investment and
long-term projects. Parking is not so complex a matter that the “invisible hand” of the market
will produce a better result as would be the case where the scope of the problem exceeds the
grasp of public policy. While parking is not as simple a matter as it appears to most people at
first blush, neither does it require the resources needed to put people on the Moon (which, of
course, we did).

Better data
Better decisions, public or private, individual or institutional, require better data. As mentioned
at the beginning of this report, some parking data is available but changes occur so frequently
that any given snapshot is of limited value.
Specific data is important for two uses: planning and consumer information.
Public or private parking decision makers should be able to access not only current parking data
but to interact with that data with their own plans and marketing information so that we don’t go
from not enough parking in a given situation to too much because three developers built 900
spaces each when there was a demonstrated need for only 1500 spaces.
Further, an accurate Parking Data Bank would become the basis for providing parking
availability information to consumers. Initially, this could be done in the form of area parking
maps and a web site showing parking locations. This could over time develop into a very
sophisticated system – initially with an online or call- in parking availability service, later a radio
format with parking information and eventually an interactive Global Positioning system (GPS).
The Miami Dade Metropolitan Planning Organization is presently considering a full- time radiobased
traffic information system. If accurate parking data were available, it could easily be
added to this radio format.

Parking Information Network
To make such data useful, Broward County could create a Parking Information Network (PIN).
This Network would, at a minimum, provide parking data to municipal and private parking
developers. It could also provide parking availability information to consumers online and
through tourist oriented brochures and, as need/demand increased, go to more sophisticated
communication methods.
Local parking providers could also make this information available to tenants and customers. At
the local level, it is also essential to provide effective, attractive and consistent parking signage
for both drivers on the street and within parking structures and lots. Better information is an
important first step to reducing parking stress (to say parking rage would be a bit much) and to
reducing pollution emitted by parking space hunting. The importance of interior signs should
not be minimized. Many parking structures and even surface lots we studied do not clearly show
the driver where to go – or not go – and drivers can end up frustrated, wasting gas and generating
unnecessary pollution.
Improving communication

A Parking Information Network would serve two very important purposes: to facilitate the most
efficient use of existing parking resources, thereby reducing the need for excessive parking
structures or lots; it could then become the platform for new consumer information technology as
it is developed and needed.
The Downtown Fort Lauderdale Transportation Management Association (DFLTMA) is drafting
a proposal (as of November 2001) to develop an inventory of parking spaces. This would be the
first step for creating a Parking Information Network. The TMA is the ideal public-private
partnership to implement the full PIN as it develops. We consider the network to be the
foundation of creating the Future of Parking for Broward County.
Immediate Steps
In addition to the Parking Information Network, there are many specific steps that can be taken
by either municipal or private parking facilities to improve the amount and accessibility of
parking in Broward County.
With or without a Parking Information Network, municipalities and public and private parking
facilities should provide more and better parking information in the form of maps, advertising
and the internet. There are several dramatic examples of how careful coordination and better
information can significantly improve parking conditions even under very adverse
circumstances: the Fort Lauderdale Air and Sea Show, the Winterfest Boat Parade and the Las
Olas Art Fairs. The Air and Sea Show and the Boat Parade have demonstrated how offsite
parking can work, bringing hundreds of thousands of people to Fort Lauderdale beach from
remote parking sites, most on buses but some even on foot. The Air and Sea Show and Boat
Parade are, of course, once-a-year events and very strong attractions. Nonetheless, it shows what
can be done and what people will do given good planning and information.
A Case Study: Las Olas Art Fair
The most recent Las Olas Art Fair was studied closely as another example of what can be done
with intelligent effort. Like the Air and Sea Show, the circumstances are out of the ordinary: an
art fair on a street which is a main route to the beach, running through residential areas sensitive
to the impact of the traffic and parking generated by the Fair. In addition, some of the merchants
on the street are ambivalent about the impact of the crowds on their particular businesses. All
together, a difficult set of problems requiring good planning and great diplomacy. It was a very
instructive case study.
To lessen the impact on the residential streets, fair attendees were not allowed access to the area.
Instead, signs directed them to fair parking at the City Park Garage and free shuttle buses took
them to Las Olas. The program was generally successful.
Lessons learned from the Las Olas Art Fair:
Properly informed and motivated people will accept remote parking;
Bigger and better signs would have helped (see graphics);
Coordinate with other area parking facilities;
If we do it again, it will work even better.
(collected from responses by observers and participants in the new parking arrangements
associated with the Las Olas Art Fair.)

Remote Parking
Remote parking is one of the most frequently mentioned “solutions” to parking and congestion
problems. Attempts have been made in Broward County using the Tri- Rail parking lot at
Broward and I-95, and the City of Fort Lauderdale experimented using the Arts and Science
District Garage for employees. Presently, a TMAX community bus route from State Road 7 and
Oakland Park Boulevard to downtown Fort Lauderdale is operated by the Transportation
Management Association (TMA).
This program could be called a success with 8 round trips (4 in the morning, 4 in the afternoon)
with an average of 57 riders at rush hour each day. Until the crunch is severe, those solutions
will work best which require the least change of behavior by consumers. (Key Point 7.)
Staggered Work Hours
Another example of an idea which requires behavioral changes is staggered work hours. There is
no real reason in many work situations why people need to arrive and leave work between 8:00-
8:30 a.m. and 5:00-5:30 p.m. A survey we conducted for this study shows some individuals are
willing to do this (some may already be doing so without a program), but for many employers,
the response is simply “we’ve never done it that way.”
Live-work arrangements
Live-work arrangements are another way to stagger hours – one need not work every hour at
home – do your e- mail at home and then drive to work or to a meeting. Again, this is more a
congestion than parking matter, but as more people do some, if not all, work at home, the
demands at peak times will decline.
Price mechanisms
Price mechanisms can be an effective way to modify behavior. As we have shown in the marketclearing”
discussion, incentives and disincentives of various kinds can make people change their
behavior. Requiring all parking to be paid by the consumer – no “free” parking for public or
private employees — and raising the prices for parking would certainly reduce demand and both
traffic and parking congestion. What sounds good to the planner or economist may not sound so
good to the individual. Most Americans consider free parking from their employer virtually a
God-given right. Students at the downtown campus of Florida Atlantic University and Broward
Community College feel the same way. They are willing to have a portion of their student
activity fees used to pay for parking, but do not want to pay directly.
Like off- site parking, increasing the direct cost to the consumer can be effective where there is
sufficient motivation. People happily pay parking fees in New York in amounts that would not
be tolerated in Broward County. Even within the county, boosting fees in downtown Fort
Lauderdale could lead to chasing businesses to other locations in the County or in other counties,
which would not only impact downtown businesses but encourage and exacerbate sprawl.
Other techniques, some low-tech which can be implemented immediately, and others which are
higher-tech and higher cost, are available.
Valet Parking
Valet parking, while requiring higher personnel costs, can dramatically increase the capacity of
any parking facility and is easily done in surface lots. It also reduces parking time and stress for
the consumer. Most commonly found at restaurants as a consumer service, it can be much more
widely applied. There are a few office buildings presently using it due to severe shortage of
parking spaces. Valet parking does not work as well where everyone arrives or leaves at the
same time as do most employees, but it does work well for in-and-out and client parking needs.
Robotic Parking
At the high-tech end (see graphic), robotic parking can also increase capacity and reduce
consumer time and stress. A robotic facility uses a pallet storage system for each car, reducing
pollution at the parking site and increasing the capacity of any given land footprint. Presently,
one cannot build a robotic facility in Broward County since parking structure construction codes
require ramps. Fort Lauderdale is presently modifying its ordinances to allow robotic parking
facilities. Like valet parking, robotic parking is not effective where everyone arrives or leaves at
the same time. However, office building developers should be encouraged to put a percentage of
their parking into robotic parking for client parking.
Mixed Surface Lots
On surface lots where peak time demand is infrequent, for example churches, codes should
allow/require a portion of the peak load parking to be on a mixed surface of hard material and
grass. This accomplishes many positive environmental benefits. First, it is more attractive and,
in our climate, possible the entire year. It naturally absorbs and filters storm water and it absorbs
heat rather than holding it on the surface and reflecting it back into the air. The projected
volumes of use for commercial surface lots should be analyzed to allow/require these surfaces.
Cross-easements
Another device for increasing the productivity of existing parking is cross-easements for adjacent
uses where the times of use do not overlap. Some cities allow this now but much more could be
done. In most areas, office building parking, structure and surface, is empty, while nearby
restaurant and bar lots overflow. If the County establishes a Parking Information Network, these
overlapping uses could be negotiated and increased, to everyone’s benefit.
Fine-tuning parking requirements
The City of Weston has modified its codes to allow fine-tuning of parking requirements based on
the actual anticipated use of a commercial or industrial property, rather than using a one-size fitsall
formula based on the square footage of the building. With today’s technology a very large
warehouse transshipping facility can operate with very few employees and few customers

coming to the site requiring very little parking. An electronics assembly plant might require
more than the formula amount. Allowing the parking requirements to be adjusted to the actual
need benefits the property owner and the community by no t wasting space with unnecessary
asphalt.
Similarly, planning codes should recognize the differences created by demographics and
economics in residential parking requirements. Presently, parking codes require apartments or
condos to have X number of parking spaces per unit. Some might modify that based on the
number of bedrooms per unit. None of this acknowledges that many upscale units in Broward
County are second or third homes. Even if it is a primary residence for someone who has other
residences or who travels a great deal, they are not parking there every day, every week.
Generally, the larger and more expensive the unit, the more likely this is to be true. To cite a
dramatic but by no means unique example, a very prominent professional athlete (who is not
with a local team) owns a large unit in a prominent Fort Lauderdale beach condominium. He is
not there every day; he does not drive to work every morning. Parking and traffic regulations
should reflect these demographic variations.
Trips Rates
The “Trip Rates by Purpose” data sheet, dated July 7, 1998, is distributed by Broward County’s
Planning Department to assist developers and planners in predicting the number of trips that a
new development could place on the neighboring road system. Under the residential category of
“High Rise,” each dwelling unit is predicted to create 0.74 trips per day from “home-based
work,” nearly 1 trip for “home-based shopping,” two trips for “home-based other trips” and 0.42
“non-home-based trips.”
Using these numbers, we could observe 100 high-rise units and expect 74 trips generated by
home businesses, 96 trips for shopping, 207 other trips and 42 other trips that are not homebased.
In total, there are 419 predicted trips. Yet, the unit owned by the professional athlete is
outside this model. If many of his friends join him in the building as second-home owners, the
100 units might generate fewer than 200 trips per day.
As long as the increase in residential units continues to be at the high end, economically, many
new owners will not be the full- time residents who enter traffic 50 weeks out of the year. The
full-time population of Fort Lauderdale might not increase significantly, and certainly a lot less
than the 40% growth anticipated in the entire county from 2000 to 2015.
In short, the demographics of the residents of a particular building ought to have some influence
on how the Trip Rates schedule and parking requirements are interpreted.
Car sharing
There are a number of sophisticated car pooling or car sharing ideas in various stages of
development. These eventually involve using technology to facilitate sharing of vehicles in
several ways. Another way of looking at these concepts is to expand the car rental at an airport
model to other situations and locations. For example, you could take public transportation to
work but if you needed a car during the day, even on short notice, one would be available either
in your building or in the area. Larger corporations and local governments presently use such
arrangements (providing a vehicle pool for use by employees) but it would not be a difficult step
to make it more widespread, reducing inbound and outbound rush- hour traffic as well as parking
loads.
Taxicabs
Another very old “technology” exists for avoiding local trips in urban areas – taxicabs. In some
very dense urban areas – New York City and Washington, D.C., for example — they are widely
used by many people who wouldn’t dream of using their car to drive from place to place in the
city. In Broward County, cabs are used largely by tourists, the disabled, and by those who
cannot afford a car. Even with the free downtown TMAX Shuttle in place, people do not
hesitate to drive from one side of the river to the other. It’s very easy. Were it to get more
difficult, taxis, even water taxis, might begin to be used for that purpose. Should that need arise,
taxis can be encouraged by setting aside pick-up/drop-off spaces for them. There are a few but,
by and large, there are no cabs cruising or waiting to be hailed. That we are not using cabs in
that fashion is an indicator that during the day, it is easy to get around and park throughout our
urban areas, even downtown Fort Lauderdale.
On-street parking
Until very recently, the trend of urban planning has been to remove as much on-street parking as
possible. This was due to traffic engineers wanting to move cars more quickly. Wider lanes and
fewer distractions — people parking, opening doors, just being there — allow greater speed. Also,
many urban planners would like to keep cars away and out of sight. More recently, however,
this conventional wisdom has been challenged. Fort Lauderdale has had spectacular results from
its decision to return on-street parking to Las Olas Boulevard, proposed by Center founder Jack
Latona when he served on the Fort Lauderdale City Commission. It significantly increased
pedestrian activity and a sense of sophisticated urban ambience, as well as increased property
values and parking revenue. The reasons for this overnight change are many: on-street parking
increases parking capacity and the perception of increased parking availability. It provides a
buffer for pedestrians and outdoor diners, an important consideration for a through street like Las
Olas. It increases the amount of visual stimulation for pedestrians – people need constant visual
change to keep them interested as they walk. Long, empty vistas discourage walking. Also,
Americans, in particular, like to see where their car is, if possible.
On-street parking is being considered anew for low-density residential areas as well. Long
considered a traffic hazard and a sign of low- income status (older homes, i.e. pre-1940,
frequently did not have larger driveways and garages), on-street parking is now being seen as
having some positive aspects. First, it slows down traffic, a good thing in residential areas.
Second, as in commercial areas, it provides a buffer for pedestrians and visual interest. Third, it
increases parking flexibility where the number of cars in a household increases, usually when the
children begin to drive. Fort Lauderdale has examined various rules for parking in swales where
there are no sidewalks: for example, no tires on the swale, two tires on the swale or all tires on
the swale. There are arguments to be made for each format and their applicability varies from
neighborhood to neighborhood, depending on the width of streets and depth of setbacks to the
front of the house.

Parking Meters
On-street parking in commercial areas raises the issue of parking meters. Meters serve two
purposes, one obvious – revenue – the other not so obvious but also important – turnover.
Turnover means new visitors can have some expectation of finding a space. No turnover,
probably the result of employees parking in front of the store, does not encourage people to stop
and shop. While people can find parking meters and parking tickets an annoyance, they not only
fill municipal coffers but serve the public as well by keeping alive at least the hope of achieving
the American dream: an empty parking space right in front of my destination. It just won’t be
free. There is a large body of information and technology concerning the placement, design and
monitoring of meters as well as an entire business of collecting parking tickets. We feel that is
outside the scope of this study.
All of the above parking strategies can be implemented with existing low-tech methods. Hightech
parking can be seen in our future as well, however.
Siemens Traffic Guidance Systems
As we have stated, changing people’s behavior is difficult. Giving them the information they
need to get to their destination, that is, a specific open parking space, can make their lives easier,
reduce congestion, and improve our environment. As described above, Miami-Dade County is
considering a full- time traffic information radio station, much like those now in service near
large airports. Parking information could easily be made available over this same station.
Siemens has developed a system that enables parking structures to measure incoming vehicles
and to direct them to spaces according to size, thus increasing the capacity of the structure. They
also have developed traffic guidance systems for traffic control which could be connected to the
Parking Information Network and direct drivers to available parking. Other techniques for
enhancing parking structures are available. Presently, it is possible to put traffic and parking
information on the Internet. Soon, it will be possible to get real time information about available
parking and reserve your space before you leave home! More and more cars are coming
equipped with Global Positioning Systems (GPS) either as options or, in some cases, standard.
G P S
While presently a one-way system – you can find out where you are – soon it will be possible to
create an interactive system. (Some vehicles also have a cell phone-based emergency system
that might be adapted to a parking information system.)
This is the perfect example of creating the future: the technology exists or is foreseeable. A chip
in each parking space will communicate to the Parking Information Network that it is empty; you
will ask your GPS to identify a parking space closest to your destination; the screen will show
you the exact location, not just the parking facility, but the space in it. You will then reserve the
space by paying for it with a credit card and go directly to the space, saving time, reducing stress,
and reducing pollution. As the cost of making this technology available comes down, the
need/demand will increase and at that intersection, the future of parking will be created.
Bicycles
When discussing parking, most people think only of automobiles. However, bicycles should also
be given some attention. Broward County and the Florida Department of Transportation have
been quite aggressive in developing bike lanes so that increasingly one can bike, either for
recreation or commuting, throughout much of the County. Less attention has been paid to safely
and conveniently parking bicycles (or motor bikes of one sort of another). Municipalities can
provide more parking for bikes and begin to require it from office and commercial developers.
There are two good reasons for such a policy. First, there are people who prefer to ride their
bikes and they are entitled to accommodation just as automobile drivers are. Second, the more
bike riding is facilitated, the more of it will occur. This is good for both the bike riders and nonriders.
Bikes are healthy for the rider, take up much less space on the road or for parking and do
not pollute. (Even motor bikes take up less space and produce fewer pollutants.) In other parts
of the world, bicycles are very important part of the transportation system, usually because they
are so much cheaper. However, particularly given our climate, there is no reason that more
travel in Broward County could not take place on bikes.
Like walking, riding a bike necessitates dressing differently than most business people presently
do. We need to get away from suits, ties, high heels and panty hose as the business person’s
uniform. In addition to reducing our traffic and parking burdens, this would also enable us to set
our office thermostats higher, saving energy and reducing pollution. Further, we would then
require less cooling as we drive home and after we arrive there.
Most traffic-policy reduction programs involve getting people out of their cars more – that will
not happen in South Florida until we “dress light.” (Key Point 8.)
Conclusions
The future of parking in Broward County can be seen and it can be created. Presently, except for
occasional peak time circumstances, there is no parking crisis in Broward County. That does not
mean there are not specific problems to be solved or that some people still may think there is a
crisis. It means we presently have the facilities available to deal with existing needs so long as
we take steps to maximize the use of what we have. That may involve more efficient use of
present spaces, better information, especially signs, about where parking is available, and, to
some degree, getting people to understand that they should not expect to find a free, empty space
ten steps away from their destination.
Will demand increase?

The future is another matter. While there are some possible changes in work and shopping
behaviors which could lead to a reduced number of automobile trips and the resulting need for
fewer parking spaces, they are most likely only to reduce the anticipated increase in demand, not
cause an actual reduction in demand. (Key Point 9)
The forecast of an increase in demand is based on increases in population, demographic changes
– more young people and more active seniors — and increasing work and non-work choices, all
leading to more trips and more non-home conclusions to those trips, i.e. more parking.
This means we should take steps today to make the parking experience of the future easier, less
stressful and less environmentally damaging.
Two poles of parking policy
Parking policies fall between two poles: do nothing, let the market take its course; or
aggressively restrict parking to shift people from their cars to public transportation (referred to as
the San Francisco Model).
San Francisco has been able to pursue this policy because it already had a very dense, very
compact urban community (49 square miles), politically willing to restrict automobiles, an
economic magnetism that drew countless new dot-com business to want to locate there, and an
existing public transportation infrastructure of buses, trolleys, cable cars, the Bay Area Rapid
Transit (BART) and a sophisticated fleet of taxis which can be hailed on the street in the
downtown.
Broward County, much larger geographically (414 square miles), has not achieved either the
population density or the economic magnetism essential to make such a policy successful.
However, Broward County is continuing to grow rapidly and a hands-off public policy will lead
to chaos in heavily congested areas of the County.
This report sets forth tiers of policy choices that can be adopted as policy makers determine that
circumstances require.
Analysis of the nine key points of the study lead to the conclusion that Broward County should
begin to develop a “Smart Parking” policy that begins with creating the Parking Information
Network which will lay the foundation for efficient implementation of the other parking
solutions available now or in the foreseeable future. These solutions will reduce stress on drivers
and on the environment and can be implemented as needed (Key Point 1). Broward County
should not wait until future developments force reactive solutions (Key Point 6). Demand for
parking will continue to increase but there are factors which may reduce that likely increase (Key
Point 9).
If parking becomes too difficult people will go elsewhere (Key Point 5). To gain acceptance of

new solutions, those most likely to succeed will impose the least change on individuals (Key
Point 7). People will not give up their cars until the alternatives are equally or more attractive
than their present circumstances (Key Point 8).
It is possible to reduce the negative impact of parking (Key Point 3). Parking facilities can and
should be as attractive as any other part of our visual environment (Key Point 4). We can create
the future of parking in Broward County (Key Point 2).
Incremental, low-cost, short-term actions
Most of the steps we have outlined are incremental, low-cost and can be implemented within a
short time frame. Only a few require new and expensive technology and those do not have to be
used to obtain much improved parking experiences. One first step is essential: obtaining and
maintaining up-to-the-minute parking information for the entire county. This will enable public
and private planners to avoid under or over building of parking facilities and allow for the finetuning
techniques we have suggested in this report. Where parking conditions are tight or
perceived to be tight, the information can then be provided to people to maximize existing
parking facilities and reduce the time and stress associated with coping with these conditions. A
Parking Information Network for the County would be a cost-effective first step to creating the
future of parking in Broward County. Other steps could then be taken as we become aware of
the need. If we begin now, we can create a future of faster, easier and cleaner parking in
Broward County.
………….

Key Point 1
Parking solutions are much less capital intense and have much shortest implementation times
than related traffic solutions.
Key Point 2
CREATE THE FUTURE OF PARKING NOW RATHER THAN WAITING FOR IT.
Key Point 3
Improving access to parking, making it easier to park, increases the perception of availability of
parking and reduces the stress of parking.
Key Point 4
Parking facilities should be as attractive as any other part of our visual environment but they
needn’t be invisible. U.S. drivers like to see where their car is and is going to be.
Key Point 5
If the experience of parking is too stressful, expensive or difficult, people won’t park there and
they will go somewhere else.
Key Point 6
Doing nothing is a choice just as much as adopting one or more policy choices. Doing nothing
actually means choosing to have a wide variety of public and private decision makers respond on
an ad hoc basis to each need or “crisis” as it arises. If the response is inadequate, people will
adjust various ways and life will go on.
Key Point 7
Until the crunch is severe, those solutions will work best which require the least change of
behavior by consumers.
Key Point 8
Most traffic-policy reduction programs involve getting people out of their cars more – that will
not happen in South Florida until we “dress light.”
Key Point 9
Changes in work and shopping behaviors are most likely only to reduce the anticipated increase
in demand, not cause an actual reduction in demand.

Background Materials
For readers who want more of the details.
The study was designed to be read in one sitting. It is supported by visuals that help the reader to
grasp the complexity and interconnections of the subject. Parking is not just about placing cars
in safe, convenient zones in a downtown area. Parking defines the interactions between people
and the environment and colors their experience of the city. The best way of capturing the
concepts visualized in this report would be with an animated documentary, which is
recommended for a future information campaign about parking policy issues that might one day
be directed at the general public. The audio- visual items that support this study as background
materials include several videos that have been converted to run on Quicktime Software.
Videos on CD:
Robotic Parking (Information)

Robotic Parking (TV broadcast)
Visit to Publix Multi-Story Garage in Miami Beach
The Case Study: Las Olas Art Fair (September 2001)
Auto-Park Demonstration
Contacts
Paul Carpenter, Executive Director, Do wntown Fort Lauderdale Transportation Management
Authority.
761 3543 Ridership runs an average of 300,000 a year. The “park and ride” lot at 441 and
Oakland Park Blvd. has about 57 riders a day. The ridership in the morning tends to be higher
than the number of riders in the afternoon (some morning commuters apparently catch a ride
home on the bus or with a friend). Two shuttle buses both make two trips in both the morning
and the evening, a total of 8 round trips per day.
Ed Davis, County Parking Manager
A fifteen-foot tall sign (viewable from Broward Blvd. along SW 1st Avenue from Broward), will
be installed on the County Garage. This is the first of what this study’s writers hope will be
more signage to help the first-time visitor to Broward County in navigating.
The diagram is a schematic: it does not represent the actual end product and it is an artist’s
rendition. It was provided by the very helpful and consumer-oriented parking manager who
works for the County.
Source: Ed Davis, edavis@broward.org
TRANSPORTATION PLANNING DIVISION 357-6608
115 S. Andrews Avenue, Room 329H, Ft. Lauderdale, 33301 FAX 357-6228
Director: Bruce Wilson 357-6641; Congestion Management Team – Enrique R. Zelaya 357-
6635; Long Range Transportation Planning Team – Ossama Al Aschkar, P.E. 357-6653
Jeff Weidner, Florida Department of Transportation
Jeff coordinated a useful series of workshops to bring together teams that are working on various
projects in Broward and Southeast Florida. His workshops helped many participants realize that
each team is not only working on a specific project, but also helping to construct part of a
transportation system for the region.
Publications
Countywide Parking Policy Study for Miami-Dade County (project No. E95-MPO-02R), August
1999, prepared by Barton-Aschman Associates. Provided by Jesus Guerra, guerraj@co.miamidade.
fl.us, 111 NW First St, Miami, FL 33128, (305) 375-4507
Year 2000 Traffic Count Report, April 2001, Broward County Metropolitan Planning
Organization.”

more to come…………

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Sore Arm & S’Mores …

November 29, 2010 by Barbara

WANT S’MORE HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS …

Dear Readers … This writer is out of commission…no pun intended …for posting right now ….due to a cortisone shot to repair the annual flu shot that I was given in the wrong place in the arm this year 7 weeks ago… (prev. post)…The damage was not as bad as it could have been and hopefully Readers made it their business to make sure they and theirs made it known the correct sight was agreed upon beforehand……. Mine unfortunately was so off the doctor is not sure I was immunized!… In any event ….pun intended …

If you want S’more places to go for the holidays … link to our sister site below….

http://heresthescooponline.com/

more to come….

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Your October Issue Of By The Sea Future Is Out Today …

October 22, 2010 by Barbara

LAUDERDALE-BY-THE-SEA’S ONLY LOCAL NEWSPAPER ….


Read the Future!

Answer this month’s poll question about a proposed Event Czar!

In This Issue…

LBTS COMMISSION CUTS TOWN BUDGET

TOWN’S TAX RATE SET TO REMAIN THE SAME

GERRYMANDERING IN BROWARD DISTRICTS

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO CONSIDER

BSO DEPUTIES BATTLE CRIME SURGE IN LBTS

GET SPOOKED AT JARVIS HALL ON OCTOBER 31

VILLAGE GRILLE’S PATRIOTS PARTY A BLAST

INVITATION TO SOIREE AT WINDJAMMER

NOVEMBER BIRTHSTONE IS CITRINE

THE FORT LAUDERDALE DIET

LIFESTYLE COLUMNS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

AND MUCH MORE…

Read It!

Link to online edition … http://www.bytheseafuture.org/

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Want S’More ? …

September 29, 2010 by Barbara

LOOKING FOR S’MORE PLACES TO GO/ GIFTS/ART/ COMMUNITY CALENDAR EVENTS IN LBTS?…

Make sure to check out  …. http://heresthescooponline.com/

Latest info on the Meet & Greet for Lt. Col. Allen West at Athena By The Sea ..(chg. of date )…as well as much more….

Do you have an event or place to go you want seen by hundreds everyday online?… This writer will be happy to post it on “sister” site Heresthescooponline…Just sent the info and a photo to barbarafcole@yahoo.com…

more to come…

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Looking For Your Local Government Official Today?…

August 19, 2010 by Barbara

THEY’RE IN  HOLLYWOOD … AUGUST 19-21…..

THE WESTIN DIPLOMAT RESORT AND SPA …. FOR THIS YEAR’S THEME …”Creating Community in Tough Times”…

“Overview

The 998-room Westin Diplomat Resort and Spa is a sight to behold, rising 39 stories above the Atlantic Ocean. Its bold architecture, comprised of art deco curves and lines, recalls the hotel’s illustrious past. Ideally situated between two international airports and the top two passenger ports-of-call , once inside, you’ll marvel at the lobby’s soaring 60-foot atrium ceiling of glass, unlike anything else in the Southeast. Gracious spaces allows comfortable accommodations for large groups while a casual elegance throughout the resort prevails. All meeting space and every guest room and suite, are state-of-the-art to meet the needs of the discerning executive traveler.

The Westin Heavenly Bed® and Heavenly Bath® will make it difficult to leave the breathtaking water views from each room – however, the glorious full-service Spa, 18-hole golf course and 10-clay court Tennis Center will make it worth your while. Relax by the outdoor bridged pool with infinity edge, see-through bottom and waterfalls flowing into the 240-ft. lagoon pool below, while pool side servers cater to your every whim. The Westin Executive Club feature upgraded amenities and access to the spectacular views from the 10,000-sq. ft. lounge offering complimentary continental breakfast, evening cocktail service and complimentary hors d’oeuvres.”

http://www.diplomatresort.com/

FROM THE FLOCITIES WEBSITE…WHAT THEY WILL PARTAKE IN …

“President’s Invitation to the
Florida League of Cities 84th Annual Conference
Dear Friends:
I hope you are making plans to attend the Florida League of Cities 84th annual conference. I
cannot think of a theme and focus more appropriate than the one we have this year: Creating
Community in Tough Times!
Our country, our cities and our citizens are in the midst of some tough economic times. This
conference aims to bring you value-added ideas and innovations that can be incorporated into
your city’s programs at low-to-no cost. We will focus on the elements within our cities that bring
our citizens together and keep them together – that sense of place, belonging and pride that
cause a citizen to say, “I’m proud that I live here, work here, play here, and raise my family here.”
This year’s theme is perfect to showcase the memorable conference event that is designed to both educate you and
provide cost-cutting ideas that will make a difference in the lives of those you serve. Designed for the new or veteran
official, this conference will give you the tools you need to solve today’s municipal problems, especially during these
tough economic times.
It is a conference that will offer a wide variety of information-packed workshops; general sessions with powerful
keynote speakers; timely information on Florida; and technical assistance and resource materials from national, state,
regional and non-governmental entities. And, in this all-important year of elections, we will feature not-to-be missed
political forums with candidates running for statewide office. Hear from the candidates on issues that matter to you
and your citizens!
Our lineup of nationally celebrated speakers will provide insightful information to leadership and governance so that
you can offer the best for your city. William (Bill) Hudnut is a former four-term Indianapolis mayor and congressman,
author, public speaker, TV commentator, think tank fellow and clergyman. Hudnut is currently managing partner and
senior fellow emeritus for the Urban Land Institute. Back by popular demand: John Avlon, author and senior political
columnist of the Daily Beast. Avlon is also the author of Wingnuts: How the Lunatic Fringe is Hijacking America and is
often seen on the major news and political television shows offering his opinion on today’s political scene. Ronald O.
Loveridge, mayor of Riverside, Calif., and president of the National League of Cities, will give us a compelling report on
the state of America’s cities. You’ll also hear from the ever-popular Dr. Scott Paine, former city councilman, professor,
noted author and League blogger during one of two “city class” sessions that will kick-off the annual conference by
providing you with an intensive, interactive educational experience. When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in
2005, a new definition of natural disaster evolved. Moreover, the impact of the storm revealed how ill-prepared the
country was to deal with this type of devastation. Join us as we hear first hand from Lt. General Russel Honoré,
the commanding general of Joint Task Force Katrina. Co-sponsored by the Florida League of Mayors, this special
presentation with General Honoré, titled “See First, Understand First, Act First: Leadership and Preparedness in the
21st Century,” will offer cities key strategies on preparedness and disaster response. This session is not to be missed!
I look forward to seeing each of you in Hollywood as we all learn from insightful speakers and innovative workshops,
and benefit from networking and information-sharing that will address your unique municipal challenge.
Sincerely,
John Marks III, FLC President
Mayor, City of Tallahassee

…………
Tentative Program
Workshop Topics Under Development
The League is working to bring you the most timely information possible. The list of topics will be
announced in the Datagram in June and will also be posted on our Web site …(BC-see link below)…

7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Registration Desk Open
7:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.
Charity Golf Tournament to Benefit
Tallahassee: A Community that Reads
8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
City Class Sessions
The League has developed two concurrent, three-hour
“city class” sessions to kick-off the annual conference.
These workshops will provide you with an intensive,
interactive educational experience. While there is no
charge to attend either session, pre-registration is
required to ensure there will be enough seating and
handout materials. Be sure to indicate which session
you will attend on the enclosed registration form.
City Session 1 – What Do I Do Now?
Presented by Scott Paine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of
Communication/Government, University of Tampa
Winning an election or re-election makes us leaders
by position. But leading is so much more than a
title and an office… and nobody prepared us for the
challenges with which events, and our constituents,
confront us every day. What are the leadership
principles and practical tools that make us more
effective leaders in these particularly challenging
times?
Using a combination of discussions, role-play and
presentations, Dr. Scott Paine, communication and
government professor, former city councilman,
Florida League of Cities columnist and blogger, and
author of Rethinking Public Leadership for the 21st
Century, will help you enhance your effectiveness as
a public leader. Paine will bring real-world, and real-

Florida, experiences to life, and challenge you to

find a leadership path through them… where your

political career won’t be on the line!

City Session 2 – Creating Community in Your
City: Partners for Livable Communities
Presented by Partners for Livable Communities
Join representatives from Partners for Livable
Communities for an engaging session on maximizing
your cultural assets as partners in economic
and social development agendas. In tough economic
times, these partnerships and the programs
that develop through them will help cities foster
and maintain their unique quality of life, often with
little or no cost to the city government.
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Technology Center Open
Need to check the local news? Are you looking for that
important e-mail? Just want to browse the Internet or
catch up on some work? The Florida League of Cities
Technology Center provides you the perfect place to do
all that with eight PCs and staff to assist you. Please note
that children must be supervised while in this area.
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Florida League of Mayors Luncheon and
Business Meeting
For more information, contact Jenny Anderson at
(850) 222-9684.
12:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Municipal Marketplace Open
1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
“Cities 101” Workshop
If you are newly elected or newly appointed, this “crash
course” is designed for you. Details about Florida municipalities,
services and governing challenges will be
discussed. This is a prequel to the popular Institute for
Elected Municipal Officials, but is not a substitute for the
three-day IEMO class.
Thursday, August 19, 2010
7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Registration Desk Open
7:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.
Charity Golf Tournament to Benefit
Tallahassee: A Community that Reads
8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
City Class Sessions
The League has developed two concurrent, three-hour
“city class” sessions to kick-off the annual conference.
These workshops will provide you with an intensive,
interactive educational experience. While there is no
charge to attend either session, pre-registration is
required to ensure there will be enough seating and
handout materials. Be sure to indicate which session
you will attend on the enclosed registration form.
City Session 1 – What Do I Do Now?
Presented by Scott Paine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of
Communication/Government, University of Tampa
Winning an election or re-election makes us leaders
by position. But leading is so much more than a
title and an office… and nobody prepared us for the
challenges with which events, and our constituents,
confront us every day. What are the leadership
principles and practical tools that make us more
effective leaders in these particularly challenging
times?
Using a combination of discussions, role-play and
presentations, Dr. Scott Paine, communication and
government professor, former city councilman,
Florida League of Cities columnist and blogger, and
author of Rethinking Public Leadership for the 21st
Century, will help you enhance your effectiveness as
a public leader. Paine will bring real-world, and real-
Florida, experiences to life, and challenge you to
find a leadership path through them… where your
political career won’t be on the line!
Thursday, August 19, 2010, continued
William H. Hudnut III
Senior Fellow Emeritus, Urban
Land Institute and Managing Partner,
Bill Hudnut Consultants, LLC
Former four-term Indianapolis
mayor and congressman,
author, public speaker, TV
commentator, think tank fellow
and clergyman, Bill Hudnut is
a senior fellow emeritus at the
Urban Land Institute (ULI) in
Washington, D.C.; managing
partner in his own consulting
firm Bill Hudnut Consultants, LLC;
a faculty member at Georgetown
University teaching graduatelevel
real estate development
courses; and an associate with
SGBlocks LLC. Hudnut is probably
best known for his 16-year tenure
as mayor of Indianapolis from
1976 to 1991. A past president
of the National League of Cities
and the Indiana Association of
Cities and Towns, Hudnut helped
Indianapolis record spectacular
growth during his years in
office. His goal was to build a
“cooperative, compassionate and
competitive” city. After leaving
the mayor’s office, Hudnut held
posts at the Kennedy School
of Government at Harvard, the
Hudson Institute in Indianapolis
and the Civic Federation in
Chicago before assuming his
position with ULI in 1996.
He is the author of Minister
Mayor; The Hudnut Years in
Indianapolis, 1976-1991; Cities
on the Rebound; Halfway to
Everywhere; and Changing
Metropolitan America: Planning
for a More Sustainable Future.
1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Legislative Policy Committee Meetings
Energy and Environmental Quality
Finance and Taxation
Growth Management and Transportation
Intergovernmental Relations
Urban Administration
3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
International Relations Committee Meeting
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Resolutions Committee Meeting
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
First-Time Attendees’ Orientation
If this is your first FLC Conference – Welcome!
This workshop will acquaint you with the League, the
conference program (with tips for the best use of your
time), how to get involved in your local or regional
league, FLC legislative policy committees and other
municipal services.
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Florida League of Mayors Board of Directors Meeting
For more information, contact Jenny Anderson at
(850) 222-9684.
6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
President’s Welcome Reception in
Municipal Marketplace
Friday, August 20, 2010
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Florida Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials
Breakfast
For more information, contact Leo Longworth at
(863) 533-3136 or visit www.fbcleo.com.
7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Continental Breakfast in Municipal Marketplace
7:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Municipal Marketplace Open
7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Desk Open
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Early Bird Workshops
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Technology Center Open
9:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Opening General Session
Featuring the presentation
of the E. Harris Drew Award
and the Years of Service
Awards and a keynote
presentation by William H.
Hudnut III.
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Roundtable Discussions
Come sit with your colleagues
and discuss fiscal
best practices, “go green”
solutions, small city issues,
financial innovations and
other topics.
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Women Elected to
Municipal Government
Luncheon
Luncheon by invitation only.
If you do not receive your
invitation, please contact
WEMG at (904) 571-4925 or
contact@wemg.org. See
letter on page 19 for details.
11:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Grants and Technical
Assistance Resource
Center
This unique and valuable
session will provide you
with grants information,
technical assistance and
other resources that are
available to your city. The
Resource Center is specifically
designed so that you
may drop by at your convenience
to meet with representatives
from various
state, federal and nonprofit
organizations that provide
grants and other services.
Preview the 2010 version of FLC’s much sought after
grants exchange guide, Financial and Technical Assistance
for Florida Municipalities, which will be sent to your city.
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Sidewalk Café in Municipal Marketplace (Cash Sales)
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Workshops
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Florida Association of City Clerks Workshop –
“Public Integrity and Transparency in Government”
Join your peers for an enlightening session with
members of the Winter Springs City Commission and
its city manager. Learn how they have taken their
focus on transparency in government and opened the
floodgates so it is truly for the citizens. The elected
officials, management and all city staff of Winter Springs
are incredibly focused on keeping the actions of the
government’s leaders open to the public. It goes beyond
Florida statutes and what municipalities are mandated
to do. It is a new mindset, a real emphasis on true
accountability and better communications. Attend this
informative session full of innovative ideas and consider
new ways to let your community know more about
their government, including what you are doing for
them, and how you and your citizens can form a more
understanding partnership.
2:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Candidates’ Forum
The League has invited all candidates running for governor,
Cabinet positions and U.S. Senate to participate in
one of two forums during the conference. The final forum
schedules will be determined closer to conference.
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Special Presentation – “See First, Understand First,
Act First: Leadership and Preparedness in the
21st Century”
Co-sponsored by the Florida
League of Mayors
When Hurricane Katrina struck
New Orleans in 2005, the
devastation was more than
anyone could have imagined.
Images of the city drowning in
the waters of the Mississippi and
Lake Pontchartrain, and of the
dire conditions at the Louisiana
Superdome and Convention Center, showed the world
that the United States was ill-equipped and unprepared
to deal with a natural disaster of such epic proportions.
In spite of questionable leadership on many levels, one
leader undeniably changed the course of the disaster:
Lt. General Russel Honoré, the commanding general of
Joint Task Force Katrina. A native of Lakeland, La., Honoré,
the “Category 5 General,” swept into New Orleans,
surveyed the destruction and took charge, bringing the
city back under control and starting the long process of
putting it back together. Honoré is a no-nonsense career
soldier who always speaks his mind. While in charge
of the entire Army east of the Mississippi, he brought
leadership to New Orleans, reminding soldiers to lower
their weapons and help those in need, creating a more
positive atmosphere as rebuilding began. Honoré is now
bringing the lessons on Katrina to organizations around
the country. An expert on preparedness and responding
to catastrophe, he offers insights into protecting people
and organizations, outlining the principles necessary
to lead through unexpected and uncontrollable crises.
In May 2009, he published his first book, Survival: How
a Culture of Preparedness Can Save You and Your Family
From Disasters. The man that New Orleans Mayor
Ray Nagin called a “John Wayne dude,” Honoré has
proven that by taking charge and creating a culture of
preparedness, whether as an individual, group, city or
entire country, unexpected crises can be managed and
their impacts can be minimized.
5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Past Presidents’ Luncheon Ticket Exchange Open
5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Municipal Achievements Event
All delegates are invited to meet and recognize the winners
of this year’s Florida Municipal Achievement Awards
program. Beverages and hors d’oeuvres will be served.
Evening Open
Saturday, August 21, 2010
7:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Past Presidents’ Luncheon Ticket Exchange Open
7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Various Local/Regional League Breakfast Meetings
Contact your local league for more information.
©Sigrid Estrada
Saturday, August 21, 2010, continued
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Registration Desk Open
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Technology Center Open
8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Voting Delegate Registration Open
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Annual Business Meeting
9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Youth Council Program
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Second General Session
Featuring keynote presentations by National
League of Cities President Ronald O. Loveridge
and John Avlon.
12:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Past Presidents’ Luncheon and Installation
of New President
2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Workshops
3:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Candidates’ Forum
6:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Childcare Provided
Pre-registration required. See enclosed form
to register.
6:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
“FLC Arts Festival” Closing Night Event
Join your colleagues from 6:30 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.
for samples of culinary delights from throughout
the state, while exploring the works of local artists
and community activities within our own festival!
After 8:00 p.m., enjoy dancing and singing along
with a rock n’ roll band.
Schedule and speakers subject to change.
Ronald O. Loveridge
Mayor, Riverside, Calif.,
and President, National
League of Cities
Ronald O. Loveridge,
mayor of Riverside,
Calif., was elected
president of the National
League of Cities by its
membership in 2009.
He has long been active
in NLC, serving as a
member of the Board of Directors and vice chair of
the Equity and Opportunity Panel. He also served on
NLC’s International Council and chaired the American-
Canadian Cities in 2004-2005. He is a past president of
the League of California Cities and served on numerous
task forces and leadership positions. Loveridge was
first elected mayor of Riverside (pop. 300,000) in
1994. He served on the City Council from 1979 to 1993
and the Environmental Protection Commission from
1970 to 1979. He is also a member of the California
Air Resources Board, the South Coast Air Quality Air
Management District and the Southern California
Association of Governments.
John Avlon
Author and Senior
Political Columnist,
The Daily Beast
John Avlon is senior
political columnist for
The Daily Beast and the
author of Wingnuts: How
the Lunatic Fringe is Hijacking
America, as well
as Independent
Nation: How Centrists Can Change American Politics.
Avlon was the youngest and longest-serving speechwriter
in New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s City Hall.
After the attacks of September 11, 2001, he and his
team were responsible for writing the eulogies for all
firefighters and police officers murdered in the destruction
of the World Trade Center. Avlon’s essay on the
attacks, “The Resilient City,” concluded the anthology
Empire City: New York Through the Centuries and won
acclaim as “the best single essay written in the wake
of 9/11.” In a profile, author Stephen Marshall wrote
“Avlon talks about politics the way ESPN anchors wrap
up sports highlights.” Columnist Kathleen Parker wrote
“Americans who are fed up with the Ann Coulter/
Michael Moore school of debate and are looking for
someone to articulate a common sense, middle path,
may have found their voice in John Avlon.”
Additional Activities
Off-Site Activities
The Westin Diplomat provides a professional concierge
desk to answer all questions regarding what to do, where
to dine and how to get there, as well as brochures on
area attractions, shopping and restaurants. For complete
information, please contact the Westin at (954) 602-6000
or visit their Web site at www.diplomatresort.com.
Charity Golf Tournament
A charity golf tournament will be held on Thursday
morning, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to
benefit Tallahassee: A Community that Reads. Enjoy a
round of golf on the Diplomat’s course while helping this
organization promote literacy and foster and develop
a love of reading in citizens of all ages. The entry fee is
$100 per person. See the registration form on page 15
for more information.
Past Presidents’ Luncheon
Ticket Exchange
The installation of the new president will take place
during Saturday’s Past Presidents’ Luncheon. When you
pick up your packet at registration, you will receive a
coupon to exchange for a luncheon ticket. The ticket
exchange booth will be open twice: Friday, August 19
from 5:00 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. (during the Municipal
Achievements Event) and Saturday, August 21 from
7:00 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. This procedure will give you
the opportunity to pick the table at which you want to
sit. You must exchange this coupon for a ticket.
Saturday Night Childcare
Childcare services will be available on Saturday, August
21, from 6:00 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. during the “FLC Arts
Festival.” This service, provided by the League through
Sitter Solutions, will be offered at no charge, but preregistration
is required.
The League will provide pizza, popcorn and drinks. Sitter
Solutions will provide quality childcare with loads of
activities and games. Toys will be provided for children
1-3 years old, as well as videos for quiet time. Pillows and
blankets will also be available.
Agenda
6:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Registration
6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Dinner
7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Activities
9:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Quiet Time and Videos
10:30 p.m. Closes
Please be sure to pick up your child by 10:30 p.m.
In order for us to provide this service, you will need to fill
out the Childcare Registration Form on page 17 so we
can determine how many sitters will be needed. Please
return childcare forms to Barbara Solis, P.O. Box 1757,
Tallahassee, FL 32302-1757 or fax to (850) 222-3806.
This service is licensed, bonded, insured and CPR trained

http://www.floridaleagueofcities.com/Events.aspx?CNID=3164

……………

more to come….

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Want S’more …

August 2, 2010 by Barbara

RECEPTION FOR BROWARD COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE REBOLLO  … AT ATHENA-BY-THE-SEA …IN LBTS … 8/4/10 …

Want S’more info?  … It will be THE place to be on WEDNESDAY  NIGHT! … http://heresthescooponline.com/

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Want S’more …

June 28, 2010 by Barbara

Places To Go  and more …. http://heresthescooponline.com/

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … S’mores Mean S’more Exposure For Your Event/Business/ Cause …

June 11, 2010 by Barbara

Dear Readers… S’more on sister site … http://heresthescooponline.com/ …. has become the “Go- To” site  for finding “Places To Go”… Want S’more?…just click on the link after you read BCbythesea…to check for “Places To Go”…..

Want your Event/Business/ Cause to get more exposure and bring more people to participate and attend?….Just send your info with a jpg. to barbarafcole@yahoo.com…

Everybody loves S’mores!….

more to come….

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Learning About The Judges…Brings It Back “Home” …

June 1, 2010 by Barbara

IT ALWAYS COMES BACK HOME, SOMEHOW…..

Dear Readers… an Avid Reader spoke to this writer last week about the judges up for re-election…I was a little embarrassed that I like most voters actually know very little about the candidates or the races … The name at the top of the list to find out about was Carlos S. Rebollo … I promised I would look into it…

With a little downtime this morning I did a little looking online …and found that this judge is highly regarded and well respected from all the comments found on various sites …Judge Rebollo has listed on his site .(see below)….as a reference The Honorable James I. Cohn, United States District Court Judge, Southern District of Florida … That struck me because I had just finished reading an article about Judge Cohn (see below) …finding he too is highly regarded and respected …One of those lawyers interviewed was the Atty. for Kenneth Wilk …. In August 2004, Kenneth Wilk shot and killed Deputy Todd Fatta while he was trying to serve a search warrant at Wilk’s house in Fort Lauderdale. A high-powered round from a Winchester hunting rifle penetrated Fatta’s bulletproof vest and hit him in the heart.The bullet passed through Fatta’s body and then hit Sgt. Angelo Cedeno in the hand and shoulder. Cedeno lost a finger from the incident. That’s right, the very same BSO-LBTS Lt. Angelo Cedeno …(see below)…It always seems to come back home…somehow….

What also came to light for me from various websites and articles is the issue of how the politicos think we vote when having so little knowledge of who the person is on the ballot before us…These articles being posted bring forth that perhaps we will vote the surname rather than the record…

If true, it appears that Judge Rebollo could be voted out because of his surname … and he’s not alone…opponents are coming forward in many such races in hopes that this assumption will hold true…

In the meantime I believe it would be a great service to the the voters of the Town to invite the candidates to come to Jarvis Hall and speak to the voters to make sure that when our residents vote, they vote for the person and their record just as they did in March…

Our Commissioners should assist in this endeavor and I ask Readers to do some homework as well before they are faced with a name on the ballot before them that might make them have to question whether they will give validity to the claims of how we vote…..

………………….

“Retain Judge Carlos S. Rebello website”….

“CARLOS S. REBOLLO

About Judge Rebollo

I have been a Broward County Circuit Court Judge for over two years, assigned to the Juvenile Dependency division handling cases where children have been abandoned, abused or neglected. Prior to becoming a judge I was a prosecutor for twenty one years, two in New Jersey and nineteen here in Broward County.

In those twenty one years I was a homicide, career criminal, organized crime and gang prosecutor.
I look forward to continue serving the people of Broward County. I bring integrity and fairness to the bench. Everyone in my courtroom is treated with respect.

Professional

* Admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court, August 2007
* Admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the State of Florida, December 1987
* Admitted to practice before the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida April 2006
* Admitted to practice before the United States Court of Appeals for the 11 th Circuit, August 2007
* Admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the State of New Jersey , May 1985
* Admitted to practice before the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey, May 1985

Legal Experience

* Appointed November 22, 2007 by Governor Charlie Crist Circuit Court Judge for the 17 th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County; Started December 17, 2007 in the Juvenile Dependency division.
* Solo General Practitioner, The Law Offices of Carlos S. Rebollo, P.A., August 2007 to December 2007.
* Assistant State Attorney, 17 th Judicial Circuit, Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, Florida,

September 1988 to August 2007. Prosecuted over 200 felony jury trials to verdict, charges included murder, robbery, burglary, other violent offenses, possession, delivery and trafficking in controlled substances and all other felonies.

* Homicide Unit October 2006 to August 2007
* Organized Crime and Gang Unit May 2001 to September 2006
* Career Criminal Unit November 1994 to April 2001
* Senior Supervisor & Supervisor in the Felony Trial Unit July 1992 to December 1994
* Felony Trial Unit December 1988 to June 1992
* Misdemeanor Trial Unit September 1988 to December 1988
* Assistant Essex County Prosecutor, Essex County Prosecutor’s Office, Newark , New Jersey ,
* June 1986 to August 1988. Prosecuted 20 felony jury trials to verdict.
* Law Clerk to the Honorable John J. Dios, Superior Court of New Jersey, Essex County, Criminal Division, September 1985 to June 1986.
* Associate and Law Clerk to the law firm of Summerville, Radding & Campbell, Jersey City, New Jersey. September 1984 to August 1985. General practice of law.

Education

* Juris Doctorate, The Drake University Law School , Des Moines , Iowa May 1984
* Dean’s List, The Drake University Law School, Des Moines , Iowa 1983 Fall semester
* Biography in Who’s Who Among American Law Students, 4 th Edition 1984
* Prosecutor’s Internship Polk County State Attorney’s Office Des Moines, Iowa 1984 Spring semester
* Student Attorney, Boone County Legal Aid, Boone, Iowa 1982 Fall semester
* Bachelor of Arts, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey May 1980
* Major in Political Science; Minor in History

Professional Affiliations Current and Previous Years

* Florida Bar
* Broward County Bar Association
* Broward County Hispanic Bar Association
* Broward County Crime Commission
* Florida Gang Investigators Association
* Friends of Florida Assistant State Attorneys
* Federal Bar Association Broward Chapter
* New Jersey State Bar Association
* American Bar Association
* Association of Trial Lawyers of America

Committee Membership

* Florida Bar – Florida Criminal Procedure Rules Committee
* Appointed July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2007; Reappointed July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010;
* Appointed Subcommittee I Chairman July 1, 2008; Reappointed July 1, 2009.

Awards and Commendations

* 2006 Commendation presented by the Broward County Sheriff’s Office, Strategic Investigation Division, Organized Criminal Activities Section, for tremendous contribution in the fight against Organized Crime in South Florida.

* • 2003 Commendation presented by the Broward County Sheriff’s Office, Strategic Investigation Division, Organized Criminal Activities Section, for leadership and dedication to Operation Goodfellas and Operation Crossover.
* April 2001 Commendation presented by the Broward County State Attorney’s Office, Career Criminal Unit for dedication, effort and accomplishments while in the Career Criminal Unit.
* October 1991 recognized as Prosecutor of the Month in the Felony Trial Unit and commended for dedicated and outstanding service to the Broward County State Attorney’s Office.

Special Skills:
* Speak Spanish fluently.

References:

* The Honorable William P. Dimitrouleas, United States District Court Judge, Southern
* District of Florida.
* The Honorable James I. Cohn, United States District Court Judge, Southern District
* of Florida .

http://retainjudgerebollo.com/about.html

…………………

Excerpts …Judge James I. Cohn

“When three of Broward County’s once powerful residents are sentenced to federal prison in the next few weeks, their fates will lie in the hands of one man — U.S. District Judge James I. Cohn.

BC-Broward School Board member Beverly Gallagher, now-disbarred attorney Scott Rothstein, former Miramar City Commissioner Fitzroy Salesman

“Cohn wields great authority and power as a lifetime appointee to the federal bench in Fort Lauderdale but outside court, he’ll introduce himself as “Jimmy Cohn” in his soft Alabama drawl or gently inquire about some personal detail you’ll have assumed he’s too busy to remember.

“A true Southern gentleman” and “tough but fair” were the most common descriptions offered by dozens of attorneys who have handled cases in his courtroom and were interviewed by the Sun Sentinel.

And yes, many of them said that he doles out tough sentences to convicted criminals.

For his part, Cohn said in a rare interview that he would like to be known as “somebody that was fair and reasonable and someone who treated people with courtesy and respect and somebody who followed the law.”

“He’s a judge who’s prepared, he’s decisive and he plays it down the middle. The rulings cut both ways,” said Bill Matthewman, a defense attorney who represented convicted cop killer Kenneth Wilk in Cohn’s courtroom in 2007.

Cohn, 61, is a lifelong Democrat nominated to the federal judiciary in 2003 by Republican President George W. Bush and confirmed 96-0 by a Republican-dominated Senate during a bitterly partisan era. His confirmation hearing was described by the Sun Sentinel as “a striking display of harmony in a contentious arena” but Cohn said that, as a Democrat selected by a Republican president, he was unlikely to face opposition.

The position of U.S. district judge is for life and appointees are not subject to voter approval. The job pays $174,000 a year.

Before Cohn’s current job, he was a Broward Circuit judge, appointed in 1995 by Gov. Lawton Chiles, a Democrat. He scored high in attorney reviews and never attracted a challenger at election time.

In his eight years on the state bench, Cohn tried 770 felony jury trials, including 144 in one year, a local record only exceeded by his friend, U.S. District Judge William Dimitrouleas when he was a state judge. Cohn believes that his work ethic helped to get him the federal appointment.

The judge sets the tone and he insists on punctuality, courtesy and respect in his courtroom. He seems bewildered by attorneys who run late or are less than totally organized.

Benjamin said he thinks the world of Cohn: “He’s the picture of what you want in a judge.” But Benjamin said he was really frustrated by the judge’s rigidity. “It’s puzzling to see that court scheduling can ever be more important than preparing a case,” the attorney said.

Cohn said he hopes he’s evolved with experience but that “lawyers are inherent procrastinators and you’ve got to set deadlines.”

Some defendants in state court, where Cohn handled career criminals who were mandated by law to receive lengthy sentences, called him “the Rocket Man” because they said “he could send you to the moon.” That reputation has stuck and some attorneys quietly call Cohn’s courtroom “the launching pad” for similar reasons.

Cautiously choosing his words, Cohn said he judges each case on its merits, considering the advisory sentencing guidelines, the nature and circumstances of the crime and the defendant’s history and character.”

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/broward/fl-judge-cohn-profile-20100529,0,3680538,full.story

…………..

Excerpts…Conviction of Kenneth Wilk….
“BSO deputy murderer sentenced to three life terms
MIAMI – A man convicted of murdering a Broward County Sheriff’s Deputy was sentenced earlier today to three concurrent terms of life imprisonment, an additional thirty years’ imprisonment to run consecutive to the life terms, a lifetime term of supervised release, and a $25,000 fine.
Kenneth Paul Wilk was also ordered to pay $300,000 to the court’s CJA fund to defer the costs of his appointed defense counsel. The court also ordered the forfeiture of Wilk’s interest in his residence, located at 1950 NE 57th Street, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, as directed by the jury in a separate forfeiture proceeding on June 13, 2007. A separate hearing is set for Nov. 2, 2007 to determine the amount of restitution that Wilk will owe to the Fatta family and Angelo Cedeno.
The sentencing announcement was made by R. Alexander Acosta, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, Anthony V. Mangione, special agent in charge, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Jonathan I. Solomon, special agent in charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Sheriff Ken Jenne, Broward Sheriff’s Office (BSO).
Wilk was convicted on June 5, 2007 of murder in the first degree for the murder of BSO Sheriff’s Deputy Todd M. Fatta, the attempted murder of Sergeant Angelo Cedeno, use of a firearm in the commission of crimes of violence, that is, the murder of Deputy Fatta and the attempted murder of Sergeant Cedeno, obstruction of justice in connection with the prosecution of Kelly Ray Jones in a prior federal case, possession of child pornography; and conspiracy to obstruct justice. The defendant has been in custody since Aug. 19, 2004, the date of the Fatta murder.
U.S. Attorney Acosta stated, “Although today’s sentence brings some measure of comfort to the Fatta and BSO families, no amount of punishment can undo or even alleviate the pain and suffering caused by this senseless murder. The loss of human life is always tragic, but it is particularly poignant when the victim is someone who so selflessly devoted his life to helping others.”

http://www.ice.gov/pi/news/newsreleases/articles/070822miami1.htm

……………….

Excerpt….

“Here We Go Again: Two Hispanic Judges File For Re-Election

Have Broward County voters matured enough to elect a Hispanic judge?
We’ll find out next year now that two incumbent Hispanic judges have opened re-election campaigns.
Broward Circuit Judges Carlos Rebollo and Carlos Rodriguez filed re-election papers in Tallahassee within the last week.
Both were appointed to the bench by Gov. Charlie Crist. They will be facing voters for the first time in 2010.
That may be the problem.
When three appointed Hispanic judges — Catalina Avalos, Pedro Dijols and Julio Gonzalez — ran last year for the first time, they lost.
Sad, but true: The loss was widely attributed to them having Hispanic names.
Having Hispanic names hasn’t deterred Rebollo and Rodriguez from running.
Rebollo and Rodriguez deserve to be easily re-elected. They would be, unless biased voters reject them because of their Hispanic names.
Rebollo and Rodriguez are two of three remaining Broward judges with an identifiably Hispanic name. The third is Judge Robert Diaz.
Judge Ana Gardiner is Hispanic, but her name isn’t.
Judge Mily Rodriguez-Powell could run as Mily R. Powell. That’s similar to what Judge Marina Garcia Wood did when she ran as Marina G. Wood.
I wish that we reached the point where a Hispanic name is not a detriment for a candidate.
But I wouldn’t count on it.”

http://www.browardbeat.com/here-we-go-again-two-hispanic-judges-file-for-re-election/

…………………….

more to come…

Post Division

Here’s The Scoop … Still No Comment … Still No “Gray Area” For Colon ? ….

May 27, 2010 by Barbara

THE OVERPAYMENT IS IN BLACK AND WHITE …

Dear Readers… After Tuesday night’s meeting and the Interim Town Manager’s report the decision and direction was made for the Town to recoup the overpayment of compensation to former Town Manager Esther Colon.

The Sentinel did a follow-up posted tonight on their website (see below)…with a second “no comment.” from  Ms. Colon and the comment from the Town Atty. that we will just ask for it first…Hmmm…

Verbatim from the Oct. 12, 2009 Special Workshop Town Manager performance Review … … Posted 10/13/09…

“Town Manager Colon-”Thank you Mayor, I know I am not on the agenda to speak but I would like to clarify some issues for the record and most of them I’ll do from just listening to everybody.”

“First let me explain something. I was not hired by the five members of the commission on this dais. I was hired by the five members of the prior sitting commission. I do want you to understand and you can check the record and you can subpoena the previous commission as well as you can subpoena me. My contract was reviewed independently by each sitting commissioner with the Town Attorney. My contract was motioned first motion to approve by Mayor ProTem Chuck Clark. It was second by Commissioner Yann Yanni, it was, excuse me John Yanni. It was approved 5-0. I read an article in the Futures paper and the only commissioner or the only elected official that was truthful in that article was mayor Oliver Parker. Mayor Parker did not like my severance position and like always I like a good little argument. He did not like a one year severance package. I said I worked too hard in this town during the broom sweep campaign. I’m sorry commissioners it was, we got locked out of Town Hall when you won so I was there. I said if that is any indication of what the residents are gonna do during election time I am not gonna put my heart and soul to run the day to day operations of this town unless I have a contract I’m worthy of. I believe I, at that time I had thirty years of public service and that is a contract that five independent commissioners reviewed with the Town Attorney, did not violate any Sunshine Laws and that is the contract they approved. Two of those sitting commissioners are currently on this dais.”

“A couple of months ago this commission started to divide , the residents started to divide. They believe they can use me as a sounding board. I will go and work with Robert Baldwin any day without a problem for one reason. Robert Baldwin never told me what to do, how to do it. All he told me was as long as you obey the law, you do  what you’re supposed to do. I have always done that in my 30+ years as a public servant. I have one fault and I have criticized this commission publicly once, only once. I have not been disrespected this commission. I have been disrespected by many residents on this dais and I have told you all I like you, I don’t like you but I’m gonna come here and do my job and if there’s one thing I will not allow anyone to do. And when I say anyone I mean my brother, my sister, my father , my mother God rest they’re all in peace, I’m not gonna break the law. The one time that I disrespected this commission was when they gave me a unlawful order. Do we remember that commissioners? And I told them you can direct me to do that and I’m not gonna do it. If that’s bein’ disrespectful and rude well then I’d like to see anyone in this commission put in this audience purposely disrespect the law. I am not a puppet. If you all think that Vice Mayor McIntee tells me what to do, boy you haven’t seen some of our good fights. I will agree to disagree with everybody that’s sittin’ on this dais and everybody that’s sittin’ in the audience and my staff who’s sittin’ up there who’s not even a third of them but boy do we have great arguments everyday too. I’ll tell you one thing that none of you know about me is I am a very fair person. You might come to my office and not like what I have to say. I’m sorry, I believe in black and white. There’s no gray. And if that style does not approve or agree with you well then I believe I requested Commissioner Dodd once to make a motion to terminate my contract. I believe that was the day the vote of confidence came and it was 5-0. Even Commissioner Dodd voted, gave me a vote of confidence. I said Commissioner Dodd if you don’t think I’m doin’ a good job then vote to terminate my contract. I don’t have a lifetime contract. Whoever keeps on inventing that story, I’m not a Supreme Court Judge. I’m a human individual like everybody else. If you don’t like me there’s nothing I can do about it. I’m gonna come here, I am gonna do my job and the only thing I ask and I’m sorry if I do have a problem with that word and many others, is that people don’t try to coerce me because it’s not gonna work. I am gonna do here and do my job until this commission or the next commission wants to do it be the Town Manager and I pray to God that whoever follows suit does not allow any resident or any elected official play political games. Because that is what I’m all about. Thank you.”

……………..

Standout comments from Former TM Colon contained above …

“and you can subpoena the previous commission as well as you can subpoena me.”

“I will go and work with Robert Baldwin any day without a problem for one reason. Robert Baldwin never told me what to do, how to do it. All he told me was as long as you obey the law, you do  what you’re supposed to do. I have always done that in my 30+ years as a public servant.”

“if there’s one thing I will not allow anyone to do. And when I say anyone I mean my brother, my sister, my father , my mother God rest they’re all in peace, I’m not gonna break the law.”

“I’m sorry, I believe in black and white. There’s no gray.”

BC- We will now see if there is any “gray” Ms. Colon now believes in ….when Ms. Colon is “asked” by the Town to reimburse us for her overpayment …thus far…

………………….

Sentinel …..

“Lauderdale-by-the-Sea seeks partial return of former town manager’s severance pay

The town commission unanimously authorized the town attorney to recover $69,308 from former Town Manager Esther Colon.

The amount is part of $296,188 in severance payments made to Colon the same week of her April 20 dismissal.

Interim Town Manager Connie Hoffmann alleged in a May 20 report that there were errors in calculating Colon’s benefit payments for deferred compensation and accumulated sick and vacation leave.

Reached at her Miami Lakes home, Colon would not comment on the town’s inquiry.

“We’ll probably start off just by asking for it and see what happens,” Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen said. “Obviously it’s a matter of great importance to the commission. We’ll seek to resolve this as quickly as possible.”

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/broward/lauderdale-by-the-sea/fl-lauderdale-by-sea-colon-overpaymen20100527,0,293477.story

more to come….

Post Division
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